Published on March 15, 2015

Hiroshige probably saw this scenery through "Tsuki no Matsu" too.

"Tsuki no Matsu" of Kiyomizu Kannon-dou Temple
”Tsuki no Matsu(The pine tree of the Moon)” is placed at Kiyomizu Kannon-dou Temple. Kiyomizu Kannon-dou Temple was built by priest Jigen-daishi Tenkai Dai-sojyo in 1631. As for the Hieizan Enryakuji Temple(World Cultural Heritage Site) is said to be protecting the demond’s gate of Kyoto, Tenkai Dai-sojyo built Kaneiji Temple to protect the demond’s gate of Edo castle. Also, he named Ueno mountain as Toeizan using the Mt.Hieizan as a model. Kiyomizu Kannon-dou Temple, which was liken to the Kiyomizu-dera Temple in Kyoto, is one of the many shrines and temples that he built.
Kiyomizu Kannon-dou Temple was very close to common people from the Edo period. Espericially the Tsuki no matsu was painted as “Ueno Kiyomizu-dou, Shinobazu-no-ike” and “Ueno san-nai Tsuki no Matsu” in “Meisho Edo Hyakkei(One Hundred Famous Views of Edo)” of Hiroshige Utagawa, an Ukiyo-e artist.
Utagawa Hiroshige "Ueno Kiyomizu-dou Shinobazu-no-ike" (National Diet Library collection)

“Tsuki no Matsu” suffered a severe damage by a storm in the early Edo period, but to revive the Edo scenery that was drawn in Ukiyo-e, it was restored in December, 2012. Through Tsuki no Matsu, which is overlooked from the Kiyomizu-dera Temple stage, Shinobazu-no-ike Benten-dou Temple, that was built to liken the Hogonji Temple at Chikubushima island in Ohmi, and the crowd of visitors can be seen. Tsuki no Matsu is said to be the molding, which was made by specialized gardeners, and the revived Tsuki no Matsu is also made with the full use of the latest gardening technology. Although a smaller Tsuki no matsu is also planted at the corner, many people do not realize and walk pass by it.(continued in the lower column)


Utagawa Hiroshige “Ueno san- nai Tsuki no Matsu" (National Diet Library collection) 

Hiroshige Utagawa is a Ukiyo-e artist in the late Edo period who painted many landscapes such as “Tokaido Gojyusan-tsugi(Fifty‐three stages on the Tokaido highway)”, “Rokujyu-yoshu Meisho Zue”, and Meisho Edo Hyakkei”. “Meisho Edo Hyakkei” is the work in his later years and is known as one of the most important work which the bird’s-eye-view is skillfully used. Especially the expression which indigo blue color is used expresses the refreshening and briskness and is even called the “Hiroshige-blue”.
Hiroshige paints the Kiyomizu-dou stage colorfully with Ikenohata area on its back and the Tsuki no Matsu standing by the edge of the Shinobazu-no-ike pond in “Ueno Kiyomizu-dou Shinobazu-no-ike” too. The revived Tsuki no Matsu is planted just below the Kiyomizu Kannon-dou Temple stage, so it can be seen from the front. The surroundings of the Ueno mountain drastically changed with new buildings built, but the Edo taste can still be felt from the view from Kiyomizu Kannon-dou Temple.

Kiyomizu Kan non-dou Temple and Tsuki no Matsu seen from Shinobazu-no-ike pond


Main temple of Kiyomizu Kan non-dou
"Tsuki no Matsu" of Kiyomizu Kannon-dou Temple
”Tsuki no Matsu(The pine tree of the Moon)” is placed at Kiyomizu Kannon-dou Temple. Kiyomizu Kannon-dou Temple was built by priest Jigen-daishi Tenkai Dai-sojyo in 1631. As for the Hieizan Enryakuji Temple(World Cultural Heritage Site) is said to be protecting the demond’s gate of Kyoto, Tenkai Dai-sojyo built Kaneiji Temple to protect the demond’s gate of Edo castle. Also, he named Ueno mountain as Toeizan using the Mt.Hieizan as a model. Kiyomizu Kannon-dou Temple, which was liken to the Kiyomizu-dera Temple in Kyoto, is one of the many shrines and temples that he built.
Kiyomizu Kannon-dou Temple was very close to common people from the Edo period. Espericially the Tsuki no matsu was painted as “Ueno Kiyomizu-dou, Shinobazu-no-ike” and “Ueno san-nai Tsuki no Matsu” in “Meisho Edo Hyakkei(One Hundred Famous Views of Edo)” of Hiroshige Utagawa, an Ukiyo-e artist.
 
Utagawa Hiroshige "Ueno Kiyomizu-dou Shinobazu-no-ike" (National Diet Library collection)
 

 
For Kiyomizu Kannon-dou Temple, please refer to “Being on the stage of Kiyomizu Kannon-dou Temple."